THE STAG

Teale and Newhouse:’ The next is a picture of two fellows that have made good—Teale and Newhouse. Miv: Is
Newhouse the fellow that used to run the Gjenwood? Pat: Yes, and he owns it now Teale is attracting much
attention as soloist at the hotel. Miv: Attracting attention? Of the public or the police?

Davis: Pat—Here’s Davis, Dimple Davis. His experience as student body treasurer gave him the money lust and he’
s now coining money somewhere in the Rockies. Miv: That’s nothing new; he was the only one in our class that
had any.

Seaton, Wood and Lewis: Pat—Here we have Seaton, Wood and Lewis. l\Iiv: I see that Seaton is manager for one
of those juvenile auto racers. Pat: Yes, and Wood & Lewis are rival grocery magnates at East Highgrove.

Mitchell, Wondries and Van Arnam: Miv—Ah. Here are three fellows that are making a name for themselves?  Miv:
Yes, they are the organizers of an army of I. W. W. ‘s, who are preparing to march on to Washington. Pat: I see by
the Enterprise they have established recruiting quarters at Casa Blanca.

W. Haas and H. Haas: Pat—Do you remember these two fellows. Miv? Miv: Yes, they were Mr. Zumbro’s best
students. Pat: Not only that Miv, but do you remember how often they used to shave? Miv: Yes, about twice during
a school term and I hear they have even dispensed with that now.

Cummins: Pat—Here is Art Cummins, alias Bulldog, champion prizefighter on leaving school, but wasn’t satisfied,
and now he is following Mitchell’s army of T. W. W. ‘s., and is writing a history of the unemployed.

Jaeger: Pat—Here is Mr. Jaeger. Mr. Smith’s best student in physics. Miv: Yes, but he has established undertaking
parlors. Pat: That’s right. I saw his ad in one of the Polygraphs. He seems to think there are quite a few dead ones
a round old Poly.

                                                                        --21--


                                                                   THE STAG

                                                   Disposition of Senior Possessions
                                                          GEO N. HOSFORD

The class of 1913, the class of 1912, and in fact almost every class since the very beginning of time, have on
class day read a will, thereby proclaiming to the world at large that they were DEAL) ONES. A will always conjures
up visions of tombstones, grave diggers, floral wreathes from designing friends and expectant relatives, and all
sorts of gruesome things.

Now, we, the class of 1914, disclaim any such mortuary needs, for we realize that we are not dead, not even
dying, hut arc just beginning to live, and are prepared to show the world that we are very much alive!

During the four years of our educational childhood we have accumulated a wealth of toys, souvenirs and all sorts
of boyish trash in general. Realizing that the time has come to lay aside such puerile possessions, we have
endeavored to dispose of them where they are most needed, and will be productive of the greatest good. With this
end in view we have forwarded them by parcels post to those whose educational status is such that these toys will
be especially appropriate. And out of the vast fund of wisdom, experience and ability that has fallen to our lot we
have likewise mailed bits that may smooth the paths of those we are leaving behind us.

At this season of the year the local postoffice is so overburdened with presents sent to us by our admiring friends
that our worthy postmaster has selected Poly Hi as a sub-station, possibly because it is a ‘‘male school.’’
Therefore it is my pleasure today to deliver to those who may he present the letters and packages that bear their
addressed. Since I am a novice at this postmaster business, I am fearful of making mistakes, and therefore I’ll read
aloud all postcards and letters, and ask you to help me determine the validity of each claim made.

Esteemed Juniors:

In order to assure you of our good wishes and kindest intentions. we hereby transfer to you, certain Seniors, who,
finding our pace too strenuous for them, have decided to remain to grace your more or less illustrious class. As a
further pledge of our good will we leave you the very efficient faculty with the hope that you will treat the members
of the same with the same consideration, loyalty and squareness that we have ever shown them. We leave with
you. too, our dozen tin spoons and all other ancestral heirlooms on the same conditions under which we received
them, viz: they must he deeded over to the succeeding class, on or before the last day of school.

In addition we leave you the buildings, and grounds, with the provision that the floor space be equally divided
between certain

                                                                         --22--

                                                                  
                                                                  THE STAG

of your members, namely:’ Overton Ross, Alfred Lynn and Frank Brown, that it may be truthfully said at all times
that they have the floor.
Sincerely yours,
SENIORS.

Dear Mr. Wallace Tate:
By a special arrangement we have been able to save all the hot air not used in recitations by Van Arnam,
Babcock, Butterfield, Lewis, Seaton, and others, and we now present to you this highly prized commodity with the
assurance that by its liberal use you will be able to graduate next year. if not sooner.
Yours,
SENIORS.

Dear Mr. Oberg:
I hereby hand over to you the office of President of the Student Body, feeling confident that if you will abstain from
further Hawkshaw methods of procedure and display the same persistent endurance that you have shown as
custodian, you will be highly successful.
Yours truly,
(Signed) W. C. PATTERSON.

Mr. Fred Dauchcy:
Dear Sir: We, as a. body, wish to present this mustache, feeling that it will make a more noticeable showing than
the one yon so
assiduously cultivated.
Yours for success.
SENIORS.

Dear Keith:
Your impersonation of the blushing bride in ‘‘Why Brown Left Town’’ was so charming, so enticing, that each of us
vowed to have one of our own, long before today. but, alas, our charms are evidently not Davisonian enough, and
so we present to you as the dearest and sweetest bride that we know, this bit of feminine apparel. Our poor
masculine taste may be at fault, but our hearts are in the gift. (Please take them out before inserting pedal
extremities).
Lovingly yours,
SENIORS.

Dear Jud:
Although you have publicly boasted that the watch presented to you in the north was a good one, we doubt it, for
we are suspicious of the Bay district when it hears gifts. Therefore we send you a proof of our pride in you, this
watch about the intrinsic value of which there can he no question.
Lovingly yours,
SENIORS.

Dear Miss Daniels:
As under-classmen must be ruled with an iron hand, and fearing your lily-like hand and stern () brow may not
always be sufficient lo keep them iii order in your book-lined sanctuary, the library, and
                                                                    —23—



                                                                 THE STAG

realizing that we, the -Seniors, have at times been the worst offenders, we wish to make amends, if possible, and
at the same time provide for the future; so it is with pleasure and with gratitude that we present to you this little
symbol of authority. Gratefully yours,
SENIORS.

Dear Miss Lindenburger:
Having partaken of your excellent lunches with great relish and huge appetites at all times when not financially
embarrassed, I beg leave to present this spoon, its use in dishing up potatoes being the only improvement I could
suggest in the highly commendable service.
Hungrily yours,
VAN ARNAM.

Mr. E. A. Zumbro:
Dear Sir: Being deeply interested in the progress of the agricultural department and realizing how much depends
on agricultural education, we wish to endow this department richly; we are therefore taking the liberty of forwarding
you this duck, hoping she will live long, and, following the classical example, produce golden eggs. In this case,
please treat her with all consideration.
Yours,
SENIORS.

Mr. Ross Keith:
Dear Sir: Knowing your affection for things electrical, we present you with this very efficient arc light. May your
future exploits shine with a brilliancy equal to the same.
Lovingly,
SENIORS.

Dear Mr. Tucker:
Having heard you contemplate entering Pomona College some time in the remote future., we decided to leave you
our family Bible. Hoping you will peruse it carefully, as at least a superficial knowledge of its teachings is essential
to entering s,9id college, as well as another highly desirable place.
Yours.
SENIORS.

Professor R. M. Mathews
Realizing and feeling sure that you realize it is the appropriateness and spirit prompting a gift, more than its
intrinsic value, that makes it dear to the heart of the recipient, we take great pleasure in presenting to you this
slight token of our esteem, love. gratitude, and sincere good will, These packages contain all the problems iii
mathematics we have had the pleasure of doing for you in the past year, and representing, as they do. some 300
eight-hour days of time delightfully spent in working them for you, we feel certain you cannot find it in your heart to
call our gift insignificant.
Truly lovingly,
(Signed) SENIORS.

                                                                        --24--




                                                                     THE STAG

Dear Mr. Phelps:
Sympathizing with your usual fruitless search for a chair the fourth period in the library, we wish to present you
with one, henceforth yours and your heirs in perpetuity.
Sympathetically yours.
SENIORS.

Mr. V. S. Dairymple.
Dear Sir: Not wishing you to lose anything on our account we wish to return to you this pound of fat, the equivalent
of which you have doubtless lost in worrying over our German education.
Lovingly yours,
SENIORS, IN GERMAN II.

Dear Mr. Smith:
Out of respect for your especial wish not to be left a bottle of hair restorer we take great pleasure in presenting
you this bucket
of the same. Yours for a heavy crop.
SENIORS.

Dear Mr. Slonalcer.
Having completed my course here and being on my way to an institution of higher learning T wish to leave you this
very useful and fitting article as a remembrance of the high lines I have had and hope you will continue to have.
Highly delighted,
Your friend,
CARTER.

Dear Miss Gregg.
Fearing you have not made good use of the invisible ink left you by the previous class we leave you this pen with
which to mark down P’s. We do not wish to belittle our gift, but we hope it will be so small as to be useless.
Respectfully yours,
SENIORS.

To the School as a Whole:
Dear Old School: We give to you the thanks which are due you as our Alma Mater; may you prosper and grow and
continue to do for all the classes to come as much as you have done for us. We are leaving you now, perhaps
forever, but we do not regret it, for we are leaving you in excellent hands—those of the Law, both I (ugh and State.
The greatest provision of the first being. “If you fellows want anything done around herc you will have to ‘get busy;’
of the second. “Whosoever being a student or being a person in attendanee at any public or private parochial or
military school. college or other educational institution. conspires to haze, etc. etc.,
Yours lovingly,
SENIORS.

                                                                             -25-


                                                                      THE STAG

                                                     The Way of a Maid With a Man
                                                               By A. B. CUMMINS

                                            The world was sad—the garden was a wild.
                                          And Man, the hermit sighed—till woman sin‘d.
                                          —Campbell.

Temporarily Clyde Asterhout was in a mental lethargy. Just at the time when his wits should have been brightest
and his mind clearest, a disconcerting dullness and commonness had come over him. and his usual genius utterly
refused to express ideas that he ordinarily formulated with ease.      

The time had come in Clyde’s life when he realized that an opportunity for success was within his reach. Yet he
was helpless to grasp it. Tomorrow he was to appear before the State Railway Commission and make a report on
his research and investigations of the past six months. It had openly been hinted that the impression made by
Asterhout at this meeting was what would determine his immediate promotion and advancement iu the service.

Sobered by these reflections and rendered nervous by their significance, he groaned impotently under his load of
responsibility. It was no use. The thought would not flow today. He doubted if he ever had been able to think, In a
moment of abandonment he put on his coat and left the library.      Going into the garage, he resignedly cranked
his ‘‘King Cole’’ and turned into’ the broad limits of ‘Van Ness avenue.

Loise Kennedy’s home was the instinctive haven for Clyde iii extremities of this kind. Whenever his creative young
mind ‘had failed to respond to his desires in the past, her suggestions and criticisms, her voice, her air of
acomplishment had been all the stimulus necessary to reawaken his faculties.

Realizing this, Asterhout’s inclinations had changed radically in the last two years. The fascination of the   
debutante, the attraction of the lovely, vivacious girls of his social set, had failed to awaken in him a feeling of trite
love and he had come to realize that after all, it was the scholarly supervision of Loise that he needed, her intellect
and refinement that he appreciated, and the mutual attraction between them that he valued above everything else
in the world.

But lately Miss Kennedy’s influence had ceased to he so great. She had become more of a critic than an
inspiration and her ideas and Clyde’s did not conform as closely as formerly.

They both had recognized those new developments with disquietude, and today as he mounted the steps leading
to the Kennedy home, Clyde somehow knew, almost animal-like, that his predicament could not be mitigated, that
Loise would not awaken what was best in him.

                                                                       --26--



                                                                  THE STAG

Tender, indeed, were the greetings of the lovers, but the man’s soberness and despair drew only inharmonious
and impossible aid from the taiented woman by his side. She understood the condition of his mind and immediate]
y suggested a line of thought and even endeavored to express ideas for him on papert but his mind was unable to
grasp her ideas and strive as she might, only more discords between the two were engendered.

Finally vexed, Clyde sought the steering wheel of his auto, and unheedingly passed through the beauties of
Golden Gate Park to the Pacific where he turned southward. When in college, preparing a debate or oration a
brisk ocean ride had always proved beneficial. The faithful purr of the six big cylinders in the grey hood, the swish
of the huge tires on the hard beach roads and the bracing force of the salty air on his face, had rejuvenated him,
and as his body lay inert beneath the wheel, deeply imbedded in the soft, leathery cushions of the seat, his brain
had been awakened to such vigorous activity that he not only created brilliant thought, but expressed it in
eloquent and forceful language.

It was now 10 a. in. Clyde reasoned that lie could make a trip down to Santa Cruz, pass through the Santa Cruz
Canyon and be back in San Francisco by 7 o’clock and still have the opportunity to make up his notes before
bedtime. The Cole responded beautifully to its master’s touch and rapidly reduced the distance to Santa Cruz, but
the cy]inders did not hum in lulison with the man’s brain, the sea breeze produced the unusual effect of making his
body vigorous instead of his mind, and he wanted to get out of the car and run madly down the road, to use up his
excess of animal vitality. Only by speeding the machine far above the law-lu] limit was Clyde able to overcome this
madness and he arrived in Santa Cruz just at midday,

After luncheon, he argued that he would give the salt breeze one more chance to work its magic effect, by skirting
the environs of 3totnterey Bay. hut the thought of the many people at the resorts Ihere, maddened him and he left
Santa Cruz inland for the passage through the Canyon. lIe thought he could stop his car when at some lonely spot
there, scale a wooded slope, and in the solitude of the pines give verbal vent to his feelings. If he could only cry
out loudly he felt that he must be relieved.

An hour’s more riding enhanced this impulse almost to the point of outbreak. At a place, some four miles west of
the little village of Alma, Clyde stopped his machine in a. sheltered nook off a branch from the main road and
stepped onto the soft carpet of a grassy vale. The slopes of the hills leading down into this depression were
steep, heavily wooded and cool. They were still, too—deathly still. Only the sound of another auto, going towards
the beach, and the chatter of two squirrels, in a nearby treetop, disturbed the silence. The sound of the
automobile seemed far away and unreal and the foolish-

                                                                         —27—-




                                                                     THE STAG

ness of the chipMunks irritated Asterhout. Even the peace and beauty of Nature failed to quiet his feelings,
For the first time, Clyde now realized that he had an insistent thirst. He thought that there might he a spring at the
other end of the vale and started in that direction. At any rate he wonid get out of hearing distance of the hilarity
of the squirrels.

It was but a short distance to the head of the little basin. There the lane turned abruptly to the left behind a low hill
and led into a healthy growth of native trees. A low bingalow lay half concealed in the grove. Gentle hillsides as a
background for the picture were green with grass. Three cows, on different parts of the slope were enjoying the
fragrant pasturage. with methodical and contented chewing.
Hoping to secure water here. Astcrhout approached the retreat, passed beneath the oaks and the sycamores,
and up to the back door of the bungalow. Just before his knuckles rapped the panel he heard behind him a
cheery and melodious voice:      “Bonsoir. m’sicu’, comment-vous fairc?’’

He turned to sec some twenty yards away a young girl, whose dark tresses were hanging playfully about her
shoulders and whose face was blushing from the recent exertion of trying to catch two white rabbits, that still
hopped tantalizingly away from her.

‘‘Ticus,’’ replied Clyde, recalling the French of his school days, “I have come for a drink of water. Surely you must
have plenty, in woods so cool and moist as these.’’ his first impression of her. reeeived at this distance, was one of
frankness and vivacity.

‘‘Pourca. you look thirsty. And we have excellent water here.
how you will enjoy it.’’

She beckoned for him to follow her arid at a short distance to the left of the cluster of miscellaneous outbuildings,
they stopped before a little dam in a mountain stream and she prettily handed him his cup of water.
‘‘A votre salird, m’sieu’,’’ she remarked, and the touch of her hand against his at the exchange of the cup did him
more good than eightyflve miles of seashore travc! had (lone. He inwardly noted that the glitter of the water had
never been surpassed by anything lie had ever seen, except the spark]e of her eye, as frankly and unafraid she
enjoyed his pleasure of the drought.

She then led the way into the pantry where from a great earthenware pitcher she poured him a glass of rich,
creamy milk. Asterhout disliked milk; he never had been able to drink it since th time when he had been a baby,
hut one glance at the maiden before him, pitcher iii hand, smilingly beautiful, made him again a baby and he
drained the glass without a blubber, even smiled when the torture was over, and complimented its flavor and
richness.

Throughout the course of the afternoon. Clyde learned that the
girl had lived with her father, Monsieur Congourdan, in this de-

                                                                        —28—-



                                                                    THE STAG

-lightful retreat for four year. that he was at present away hunting in the hills, and that there was another little
bungalow across the mountain stream that was rented each summer, at an exorbitant rate, to outing seekers from
the cities.

At 5 o’clock the girl thought it necessary to imprison her rabbits again. They found the two runaways a. short
distance from the bungalow, but their capture was not so easily executed. Under the excitement of the chae for the
rabbits, and under the lure of the maid’s fascination, thought of the morrow left the luau’s mind and lie laughed as
merrily and boyishly in the chase, as did the happy. versatile little uaiad, that he was helping.
Once they ha ci one of the rodents fatally enclosed between themselves and a huge rock. Cautiously they
advanced on it, their pulses quickened by the excitement of the moment. Then the animal instantly turned about,
and before Clyde could prevent it, had hounded safely between his legs and was away.

They both looked sportively into each other’s eyes and broke “nt laughingly. The echoes of the laughter scented
to come back as one happy peel, and they both wondered agreeably at the ph C Ito men on.
Finally, the two rabbits were captured and as the two downy little rascals were snuggled up to her bosom,
caressed by her hands and cooed to. the luau philosophized on how ignorant a rabbit must lie to try to escape
imprisonment when such a reward was to he his only punishment.

The three cows were next directed into the. ttl)le and after he had filled their managers with sweet smelling hay
that awakened every memory in him of joys he had once enjoyed on his uncle’s farm, she brought out the milk
buckets and the sound of the streams of milk, as she directed them skillfully against the side of the pail. never’
sounded sweeter to mortal man than those directed by this cheery. mountain miss, did to San Francisco’s troubled
young railroad expert, this summer afternoon.

lie then tried to milk the cow next to the one the girl was working with. The futility of his big, powerful fingers to
draw anything but an intermittent stream from the udder, highly amused theni both and occasioned much laughter.
Whenever she came closely to show him the knack of the operation, he was pleasurably thrilled by her presence,
and more than once felt t.he irapnlse to take her into his arms.

The cow’s temper, however, became ruffled by this somewhat inusual treatment and Asterhout had to retreat from
the stall. Standing near her during the rest of the milking period, they chatted informally and familiarly, both
oblivious of anythiug hut their happiness. As he stood watching her full rounded maidenhood, childish trust,
confidence, and feminine beauty, the conviction stole over him that in this merry. French-American mountain girl,
was embodied

                                                                  —29—



                                                              THE STAG

the perfection of• every virtue that his ideal commanded. Her thoughts were pure, guileless and simple, but they
revealed the depths of a woman’s soul, not of a child’s blissful ignorance or a scholar’s acquired polish.

It was 7 o ‘clock when the man left for his long waiting automobile. Just before he did so he wanted to express
some of his feelings to the girl, even tried to taste the sweetness of her lips, but she tactfully avoided this. In his
tenderness he never pressed his desires, but realized his fill of joy from the simple, honest handshake that she
granted him. As he left her laughter rippled softly after him like liquid silver in the twilight and gladdened him.


‘Au’ voir, m’sieu’,” she called out, and he thought as he went that she had flung a kiss towards him.

‘Bonsoir, mademoiselle,’’ he answered and returned to his auto.

Its two powerful searchlights glowing, the Cole bounded out onto the Canyon road and towards home As the big
car sped through Los Gatos. Palo Alto, Menlo Park. Redwood City, Sau Mateo and into Frisco, the vision of the
girl faded away from the mau’s mind, and as the great intelligent machine responded to the slightest pressure of
hand or foot, and his body lay passively upon its fleeting framework, the mind of the man was awakened, his
genius unfurled and his thoughts were clear and forceful.

He felt he was before the commission and his enthusiasm was winning them to his side. Again his mind was cool;
his words were being weighed in the delicate balance of these men’s experience and it was taking all of his
creative skill and ingenuity to meet the occasion—but he was winning.

By the time that he arrived home, and locked the ear in the garage, he repaired to the library and there logically
arranged his thoughts in the skeleton of a great report. At 3 o’clock a. m. he retired and spent six hours in cool,
quiet and untroubled sleep.

The next afternoon, he appeared unruffled before the eommismon. many railway magnates and statesmen. The
fame that he earued as a. college orator in previous years was that day made to look insignificant in comparison
with the success that he achieved in this one hour’s address.

Characterized 1w earnestness and forcefulness at first, his personality and magnetism soon carried the audience
with his every thought and point. They lost sight of the man as a speaker; they did riot note his gestures or
technical skill. hut they were infused, impressed and carried away with the importance of the work that he had
been doing the past half year, the nature of the disclosures that he was making and the suggestions that he was
putting up before them.

When the report was closed, and the officials were bestowing congratulations upon the speaker, they immediately
began talking about future work, what Asterhout advised to be done in this ease,

                                                                      —30—




                                                                  THE STAG

and he realized that he had won and that the first part of his mark in the railroad world had been made.

Yet above the honors that were thrust upon him, above the heads of the prominent men about him, he looked off
to the hills where a sweet-faced gin had enchanted him with a, merry laugh and a winsome personality. He looked
beyond a magnificent residence on Van Ness Avenue to a little bungalow across a mountain stream from another
little bungalow, and he looked above the scholarly criticisms of an accomplished woman to the inspiration of a few
hours spent with a clean, wholesome slip of a mountain girl.





































                                                                               —31—


                                                                           THE STAG

                                                                          DRAMATICS

Dramatics have played a large part in the activities of the school tins year. A beginning was made in a small way
when the Senior boys entertained the Senior girls with a drama, ‘‘ Poly ‘s Dream,’
which was written by Mr. Ockerman of the English department. It was very successful and from its success has
sprung the more elaborate successes of the season, ‘‘Why Brown left Town’’ and ‘‘Zaragueta.’’

The following paragraphs are reprinted from the ‘Press’’ and give the point of view of the patrons better than a
student could hope to do.

                                      ‘WHY BROWN LEFT TOWN” IS HIT OF THE SEASON
Large Audience Applauds Efforts of Young Thespians—Great Credit Due C. C. Ockerman, Who Coached Players

Those persons, lucky enough or wise enough. to hold seats in the auditorium of the Polytechnic High School on
evening of May 8, and who witnessed poor Brown arid his seemingly never ending round of marital troubles, did
not iii the least blame that much harassed young man for leaving town. They were glad, nevertheless, that Brown,
with his charming wife, did not leave town, until the public had been taken into their confidence concerning their
woes.

li’un. clear, fine, uproaring fun, filled every second of that merry comedy. ‘‘Why Brown Left Town.’’ and the
sympathetic audience which filled the large auditorium, appreciated to the utmost every joke. and they laughed for
the sheer joy of watching the actors and actresses. Every boy did splendidly, to say that any particular one was a
star, would be to show a lack of judgment on the writer’s part, for every one was a star, from havina Daly, the
cook, who was a lady, to the John Brown, whose relatives were the torment of his lie.
To make clear to those who could hot or would not sec the boys in this merry. mirth creating farce, it would be
better to go straight down through the program and tell who and what everyone was. I’ricstley Horton, as ,John
Brown, was as clever and fascinating a leading man as one could wish, and the manner in which he made love to
his wife and also got rid of his many relatives, was delightful. General Billetdonx, very Frenchv, with smart goatee
and high silk hat, with no fear of his wife, save when she suddenly appeared, was a difficult role, ably interpreted
by Walter Patterson. That poor little Count von Guggenheim. who for lack of acquaintance with the

                                                                      —32—-


                                The following pages are part of the front of the book.

                                                               THE STAG
                                                                    1914
                                                
                                                (This is the title page above.)











                                                  
                    (The Cover is below. I am sorry, it is the best I can do under the circumstances.)

                                     Cover does not copy over yet. We are working on it.


                 (The inner title page and the dedication page were printed in old English lettering.)












We are working on getting this page corrected. More later.


EDITORIAL STAFF
GEORGE N. I-1ONF’ORI)
I)0I(HAS \ I’PIE\VITITF— AIt’rIUTFt 13. (ll:MM INS -
NYE (. ()TIERC - - -
\VIIJIAM IIAYMONI) -
F. STANTON PAUKARI) - - . -
STANIEY (I’Nl)IWF
MAX\VEII IIOTUEIKISS -
RAY V. STRl(KIjER - -
(IWIN HEI1s4IIAW - - -
1 ARK 13L’’I’TERF’IELI) — — x\rll\(F ‘FATE - - - -
IIOlE1t }3A(f\VEII - - -
LEWIS HOYT -
H.. M. MAT[JEWS -
A. HAVEN SM I’l’II
(1. ROSS ROBERTSON
- - Editor iii (thief
- Assoriate Editor rary Editor
---SehOol Notes
- - - - I )ehatingSports
‘Cm e k Re prese ii tati ye
BUSINESS STAFF
RAYMOND ALLiSON Business Maintger
\rE9IF:y FREEMAN kssistarit Business Manager
W1I1ARl) BA BCOCK ssistarit Business Manager
hes
Art
2KCIiaIIges
— — Rep n se ‘tat i ye Sc IHor (‘lass
- - Represerita ti ye ii ui or ( lass
Representative Sophomore (Nasa
— Representati ye F’reshn,e,, ( lass
— — - I1’aeflItv Represeiitative
Photographer Photographer
-I

Hopefully we will have the additional photos from the annual placed here.
Third Annual
Publication of
Riverside Polytechnic High School
Riverside, California
A Boys School
June 19, 1914
Press Printing Company
Riverside Cal.
Dedicated
to
Mr. W. A. Avey
Of the School Board
In appreciation of his efforts for us the
improvements in the great Natural Stadium
given us by the citizens of Riverside
March 1914
The 1914 Stag
Pages 21 through 32 plus some other pages to be sorted out later.

Please note; there are many corrections that need to be made within the text.
THE POEM

Tho gentle muse of thought sublime,
Whom all invoked in olden time,
And with their prayers, when thee they sought,
The power of music always brought.
A faithful one—aid now my task
her gentle maid of me did ask.
To write for her a poem

And so I sit me down to write.
With mind so dull and heart so light.
While through my brain strange thoughts do float.
A harder verse I never wrote.
And now you see I've done my best
To fill this maiden ‘s strange request,
I've writ for her a poem.

--W. T., ‘15
INDEED, WHY NOT?

(To A. Haven Smith.)

Scrape! Scrape! Scrape!
Each morning I have to Shave.
And then with a tonic to coax the hair
The top of my head I lave.
And this is the song I spin
While giving the blade a shove
"Why can ‘t I be bald upon my chin
And have whiskers that grow above?’’
                                                                               Page
Dedication ......................................................................  2
Editorial Staff ..................................................................  3
Contents .........................................................................  4
Stags of ‘14 ....................................................................  5
A Junior’s Tribute ........................................................... 16
Class History ..................................................................17
Class Oration .................................................................18
Class Prophecy ..............................................................19
Disposition of Senior Possessions ..................................22
“Tile Way of a Maid With a Man.” By A. B. Cummiris .......26
“The Poem’ .....................................................................31
“And Wily Not” .................................................................31
Dramatics 32
Cast in “Why Brown Left Towji ........................................34
Athletics ..........................................................................36
Football .......................................................................37
Football Team .............................................................38
Basket Ball ..................................................................39
Basket Ball Team ........................................................40
Baseball ......................................................................42
Baseball Team ............................................................82
Track ...........................................................................45
Track Team .................................................................84
Editorials .........................................................................51
Polygraph Staff Picture ...................................................52
School Notes ...................................................................54
Student Body Board ........................................................55
The Faculty .....................................................................57
Exchanges ......................................................................58
The Band ........................................................................61
The Band Picture ............................................................59
Tile Orchestra .................................................................61
The Orchestra Picture ....................................................60
Agricultural Club Notes ...................................................62
Wehsteriaij Literary Society ............................................63
Websterian Liternry Society Picture ...............................64
Student Body Omcers ....................................................65
Senior Picture .................................................................66
Senior Notes ...................................................................67
Junior Picture ..................................................................63
Junior Notes ....................................................................69
Sophomore Picture .........................................................70
Sophomore Notes ...........................................................71
Freshmen Picture ...........................................................88
Freshmen Notes .............................................................72
Debating .........................................................................72
Debating Picture .............................................................86
CustodIan on the War Path .............................................74
.loshes ............................................................................76
Ladies .............................................................................78
Typical Examination Questions .......................................90
Pictures of School .........................92, 94, 96, 98, 100, 102